Research

Researchers Propose Important Link Between Microbial Infections and Cancers

In a review article appearing in the November 18, 2019 issue of Trends in Molecular Medicine, University of North Carolina at Charlotte cancer biologists Pinku Mukherjee and Mukulika Bose discuss a mechanism that, they suggest, may implicate bacterial infections in a wide variety of cancers. This is a cause that science has yet to fully understand.

Bioarchaeology Of Community: Researcher Studies Bones to Illuminate Past Lives

UNC Charlotte bioarchaeologist Sara L. Juengst studies human skeletal remains to learn about and tell the stories of past communities and cultures. Bioarchaeologists study burial sites, items found at burial sites, and bones.

Archaeological Evidence Verifies Medieval Accounts Of First Crusade

Finds at the UNC Charlotte-led archaeological dig on Jerusalem’s Mount Zion confirm previously unverified details from nearly thousand-year-old historical accounts of the First Crusade. This is history that had never been confirmed regarding the five-week siege, conquest, sack and massacre of the Fatimid (Muslim)-controlled city in July of 1099.

Exchange Magazine 2018-19 Vol. 2

In this issue of "Exchange," the College magazine, we stop and remember our shared values, and we consider how these touchstone values are helping our community to find the way back from the appalling events of April 30. We include a brief series of stories that highlight the importance that connections have made in the healing process.

Psychological Science Professor Lauded For Innovation With Students

James Cook, a professor in the Department of Psychological Science at UNC Charlotte, has received the 2019 Outstanding Educator Award, a top award given by the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), Division 27 of the American Psychological Association. The award recognizes Cook’s long-standing and far-reaching contributions to community psychology and community research and action through education.

Historian’s Book Chosen for New Publishing Imprint Featuring Leading National Authors

A book by UNC Charlotte history professor Karen L. Cox about Confederate monuments is one of the first four books under contract in the newly created Marcie Cohen Ferris and William R. Ferris Imprint for high-profile, general-interest books about the American South. Authors chosen are considered among the nation's leading authors.

Evidence Of Babylonian Conquest of Jerusalem Found in Mount Zion Excavation

Researchers digging at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s ongoing archaeological excavation on Mount Zion in Jerusalem have announced a second significant discovery from the 2019 season – clear evidence of the Babylonian conquest of the city from 587/586 BCE.

Doctoral Student Forms Bonds Through Chemistry, Dance

Margaret Kocherga’s story is one of a young scientist and artist who is making connections and encouraging others; discovering and sharing knowledge; and keeping a sharp eye on a dizzying array of daily tasks. Along with her research, Kocherga makes time to engage the community in science, and to also dance and teach dance.

Food Research Engages Faculty, Students, Community

Being an informed citizen in a democracy necessitates understanding the people who make, and will be affected by, community decisions. The Civic Eats project seeks to help create a better informed Charlotte citizenry through a focus on the connective potential of foodways – or why we eat, what we eat, and what it means.

Caffeine Can Darken Moods, As People Face Work Stress

Bummed out by ongoing work stress? Tempted to reach for yet another cup of coffee to help you cope? Resist the temptation – unless you want to darken your already gray mood to pitch-black, according to a UNC Charlotte study by doctoral student Lydia G. Roosand Jeanette M. Bennett, associate professor in the Department of Psychological Science.