Research

UNC Charlotte Earth Scientist Researches Landscape Evolution In Antarctica

Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys region is one of the coldest, driest, and windiest places on the planet. Temperatures in this area can plunge to 58 degrees below zero. Its deposits and landforms contain records of past climate not accessible elsewhere in the world. Antarctica’s unique climate enticed UNC Charlotte earth sciences researcher Martha Cary Eppes and her research colleagues to spend weeks camping out in a tent in the sub-zero temperatures, in order to – literally – monitor and listen to rocks as they fracture.

Study Of Women In The One Percent: Glass Ceiling More Extensive Than Previously Thought

Men hold nearly all primary breadwinning positions in top income households, and the glass ceiling that has hindered women’s advancement in the workplace is more extensive than previously thought, a new study by UNC Charlotte researcher Jill Yavorsky and colleagues finds.

UNC Charlotte, Gaston College, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Grow Collaboration, With NIH Support

A new collaborative effort called the Bridges to Baccalaureate Program is designed to help students at UNC Charlotte, Gaston College, and Rowan-Cabarrus Community College complete undergraduate biomedical degrees and, ultimately, succeed in biomedical careers. The initiative is made possible through support from the National Institutes of Health, with funding expected to total $1.37 million over five years.

Graduate Student Research Focuses On Lessons of 1918 Flu Epidemic

Flu season is upon us once again. This October marked the 100th anniversary of the Influenza Epidemic (Spanish Flu) of 1918 in North Carolina, and we can learn lessons from the historic event. Lauren Austin, who earned her Public Policy Ph.D. and master’s degree in History from UNC Charlotte, researched this influenza pandemic, which left citizens “afraid to breathe,” as she describes it. Her research, with co-author Dr. William P. Brandon, appears in the book, “North Carolina’s Experience during the First World War,” co-edited by UNC Charlotte history professors Dr. Steven Sabol and Dr. Shepherd McKinley.

Doctoral Student Studies Soybean To Address Poverty, Hunger Issues

Keeping her native land of Bangladesh close to her heart, Farida Yasmin has come to UNC Charlotte to research the woes of the soybean, which, as a critical global resource, provides more than half of the world’s vegetable oils and proteins. She is conducting research as a doctoral student in Bao-Hua Song’s lab in the Department of Biological Sciences.

Lewis To Research Black Girlhood During National Humanities Center Residency

UNC Charlotte Associate Professor of English Janaka Bowman Lewis will spend four weeks this summer in residency at the National Humanities Center in the Research Triangle Park, working on a project about “Black Girlhood and the Power of Belonging.” Lewis will join a select group of about 40 scholars from across the nation who have been chosen to do research in residency at the Center.

MPA Capstone Project To Assess Impact Of Culture Blocks

The Arts & Science Council's Culture Blocks program brings arts, science and history experiences into neighborhoods – at libraries, parks, recreation centers, and other community spaces. Through the UNC Charlotte Master of Public Administration capstone project, MPA student researchers are helping the ASC and their community partners better measure and understand the impact of the program.

Heart and Home: Writer Challenges, Inspires With His Words

In his 2017 memoir At Home, Away From Home, UNC Charlotte’s Tanure Ojaide speaks of the indelible impressions from his early years in Nigeria. In his words, “One does not forget what one yearns for at heart.” At age 70, many of his poems, short stories, critical essays, and books serve as activist works calling out for justice and fairness for the people and the ecosystem of the Niger Delta.

Vivero-Escoto Lab Receives NSF Funding to Continue Cancer Research

To further research efforts in improving delivery and impact of cancer treatments through nanoscale science, the lab of Juan Vivero-Escoto, associate professor of chemistry, has received $100,000 in funding from the National Science Foundation.

NSF Graduate Research Fellows Enhance Reitzel Lab

Adam Reitzel’s marine sciences lab includes three National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellows (and other NSF grantees). Recipients of these fellowships are high-potential, early-career scientists and engineers, who receive funding to support graduate research training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. In addition to covering students’ research and educational expenses, the NSF Graduate Fellows program provides access to diverse research experiences and research settings around the world.  
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