Ink

Professor Receives Prize For “Best Book In Modern French History”

A book by UNC Charlotte History Professor Christine Haynes has been chosen the best book in modern French history (post 1815) over the previous two years, receiving the inaugural Weber Book Prize from the UCLA Department of History.

Historian's New Book Documents Life of Civil War Officer

In the new book Dear Delia: The Civil War Letters of Captain Henry F. Young, Seventh Wisconsin Infantry, UNC Charlotte historian John David Smith and coauthor Micheal J. Larson have provided a deeper look at Young’s letters through their detailed research and annotations. On Wednesday, Nov. 13 at 3 p.m., Smith will sign copies of the acclaimed book at Barnes and Noble Charlotte bookstore in the Popp Martin Student Union.

Book Delves Into Campaign Finance Complexity

Newcomers wanting to run for public office face a steep learning curve, as measured in time and effort. Author Mary Jo McGowan Shepherd, a lecturer in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at UNC Charlotte, in her new book examines the hurdles created by the campaign system and the potential impact on democracy.

Religious Studies Professor Publishes Enoch Volume

John Reeves, Blumenthal Professor of Judaic Studies, and Annette Yoshiko Reed of New York University have published a work they hope will provide historians of religion with a new tool to explore the intertextual relationships between different religious corpora and the intertwined histories of the major religious communities of the ancient and medieval Near East.

Historian Compares Treatment of Nomadic People by U.S., Russia

Historian Steven Sabol's new book is a happy coincidence of fly-fishing and history. During a 2006 fishing trip to trout-filled Nez Perce Creek in Yellowstone National Park, Sabol spied a sign with tantalizing details about the flight of the Nez Perce through the park in the 19th century. The sign set Sabol on a comparative history journey exploring the treatment of nomadic people by two empires - the U.S. and Russia.

Africana Studies Professor Wins Award For First Book

A book by UNC Charlotte Africana Studies associate professor Oscar de la Torre, The People of the River: Identity and Environment in Black Amazonia, 1835-1945, has received the inaugural Outstanding First Book Award from the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora.

College Authors Explore Tenets Of Government, To Educate And Inform

From an unprecedented look at what has been called the Gifted Generation, to a behind the scenes review of the costs and benefits of hosting major political party conventions, to an exploration of the factors that prompt citizens to reject public policies that appear to give them exactly what they want, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences faculty have published an array of books that pull back the curtain on government topics that affect citizens’ lives.

Nationally Noted Book Gives Sage Advice For Better Meetings

Most meetings end with attendees wondering what was accomplished. In 2019, leaders everywhere or pretty much anyone who interacts with others should resolve to read the new book, "The Surprising Science of Meetings", by UNC Charlotte’s Steven Rogelberg. "The Washington Post" recently listed it as one of 10 leadership books to watch for in 2019.

Retired Professor's Historical Fiction Book Wins National Award

A Call to China, a book written by UNC Charlotte retired religious studies professor Jeffrey Meyer, is a silver winner in the historical fiction category of the Independent Book Publishers Association Benjamin Franklin Awards™. A professor at UNC Charlotte for 35 years, Meyer taught Asian religions in the Religious Studies department, with a focus on Buddhism and Daoism.

English Professor Bryn Chancellor's Debut Novel Wins National Acclaim

UNC Charlotte author Bryn Chancellor’s debut novel, Sycamore, has earned critical acclaim on the national stage, lauded as a riveting tale of how a teen-age girl’s mysterious disappearance has haunted her Arizona hometown and how the discovery of her remains leads to unexpected healing and forgiveness.