Ink

College Authors Explore Tenets Of Government, To Educate And Inform

From an unprecedented look at what has been called the Gifted Generation, to a behind the scenes review of the costs and benefits of hosting major political party conventions, to an exploration of the factors that prompt citizens to reject public policies that appear to give them exactly what they want, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences faculty have published an array of books that pull back the curtain on government topics that affect citizens’ lives.

Nationally Noted Book Gives Sage Advice For Better Meetings

Most meetings end with attendees wondering what was accomplished. In 2019, leaders everywhere or pretty much anyone who interacts with others should resolve to read the new book, "The Surprising Science of Meetings", by UNC Charlotte’s Steven Rogelberg. "The Washington Post" recently listed it as one of 10 leadership books to watch for in 2019.

Retired Professor's Historical Fiction Book Wins National Award

A Call to China, a book written by UNC Charlotte retired religious studies professor Jeffrey Meyer, is a silver winner in the historical fiction category of the Independent Book Publishers Association Benjamin Franklin Awards™. A professor at UNC Charlotte for 35 years, Meyer taught Asian religions in the Religious Studies department, with a focus on Buddhism and Daoism.

English Professor Bryn Chancellor's Debut Novel Wins National Acclaim

UNC Charlotte author Bryn Chancellor’s debut novel, Sycamore, has earned critical acclaim on the national stage, lauded as a riveting tale of how a teen-age girl’s mysterious disappearance has haunted her Arizona hometown and how the discovery of her remains leads to unexpected healing and forgiveness.

Scholar's Book Analyzes Freedom, Citizenship In Study of Black Militia

History professor Gregory Mixon's new book analyzes one state’s process of freedom, citizenship and the incorporation of African Americans within the political and economic structure of the United States after the Civil War. "Show Thyself a Man: Georgia State Troops, Colored, 1865-1905" explores how both independent militias and state-sponsored militias defined freedom and citizenship for African Americans.

Book Delves Into Campaign Finance Complexity

Newcomers wanting to run for public office face a steep learning curve, as measured in time and effort. Author Mary Jo McGowan Shepherd, a lecturer in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at UNC Charlotte, in her new book examines the hurdles created by the campaign system and the potential impact on democracy.

Religious Studies Professor Publishes Enoch Volume

John Reeves, Blumenthal Professor of Judaic Studies, and Annette Yoshiko Reed of New York University have published a work they hope will provide historians of religion with a new tool to explore the intertextual relationships between different religious corpora and the intertwined histories of the major religious communities of the ancient and medieval Near East.

Historian Compares Treatment of Nomadic People by U.S., Russia

Historian Steven Sabol's new book is a happy coincidence of fly-fishing and history. During a 2006 fishing trip to trout-filled Nez Perce Creek in Yellowstone National Park, Sabol spied a sign with tantalizing details about the flight of the Nez Perce through the park in the 19th century. The sign set Sabol on a comparative history journey exploring the treatment of nomadic people by two empires - the U.S. and Russia.

Historian's Book Offers Fresh Look at Business Role in World War II

In his acclaimed book, Destructive Creation: American Business and the Winning of World War II, research by UNC Charlotte history professor Mark Wilson offers a fresh and fascinating look. During World War II, the United States transformed its massive economic capacities into military might, which proved critical to winning the war against the Axis powers.

To Kill A People: Cox's Book Considers Genocide in 20th Century

Throughout history, governments and armies have conspired to brutally wipe out entire groups of people through mass murder and the destruction of social and cultural structures, in an ancient practice that since World War II has been labeled by the term genocide. UNC Charlotte's John Cox offers a new perspective on the meaning and significance of genocide in his book, "To Kill a People: Genocide in the Twentieth Century."
Skip to toolbar