Personally Speaking with John David Smith

President Abraham Lincoln’s January 1, 1863, Emancipation Proclamation set in motion the abolition of African American slavery, a move he later described metaphorically as a “king’s cure” for America’s “evils.” Lincoln’s emancipation edict also authorized the mobilization of African Americans to serve in the Federal armies to suppress the Confederates’ insurrection.

In Lincoln and the U.S. Colored Troops, author John David Smith tells the story both of Lincoln’s decision to use African Americans to keep the Union intact and the yeoman service of the more than 180,000 black soldiers who donned Union blue.

Join the conversation with Smith about his book at Personally Speaking, the author/researcher series presented by UNC Charlotte’s College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and J. Murrey Atkins Library. The talk will begin at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10, at UNC Charlotte Center City (320 E. Ninth Street, Charlotte). A book signing and reception will follow.

Personally speaking is open to the public without charge, but RSVPs are requested. Parking is complimentary at two lots directly across Ninth Street and directly across Brevard from UNC Charlotte Center City.

For more information, visit: http://clas.uncc.edu/ps.

Smith, the Charles H. Stone Distinguished Professor of American History at UNC Charlotte, has taught at several universities including North Carolina State University as Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of History, and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, as Fulbright Senior Professor of American Studies.

In addition to lecturing in eleven foreign countries, Smith has published more than 150 scholarly articles and book chapters as well as 25 books.

His numerous honors include the Mayflower Society Award for Nonfiction, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for the Study of Human Rights in North America, the Richard H. Collins Award, Kentucky Historical Society, and the Thornton W. Mitchell Service Award, Society of North Carolina Archivists.

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