Exploring American Sacred Values, a Teachers as Scholars event

When February 21, 2019, 5:30 PM - February 21, 2019, 8:00 PM
Where Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts + Culture
Website http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eg022yqc7659b20c&llr=uznkfneab
Speaker(s) Exploring American Sacred Values - Kendall Mobley, Assistant Professor of Religion, Johnson C. Smith University
Intersection of African-Americans, Civil Religion and Media Influence - Franchone Bey, Teacher of Creative Writing, Speech & Debate, Film as Literature, Journalism; West Charlotte High School
Harmony at the Key: Conversations on the Court - Deborah Brown, Teacher of English Language and Composition, Zebulon Vance High School
At What Cost? Native American Children and Boarding Schools of the 19th and 20th Centuries - Tracy Kennedy, Teacher of Elementary Language Arts and Social Studies, E. E. Waddell Language Academy
Recognizing the Wilson Way Values in the American Revolution - Pia Townes, Teacher of 8th Grade Social Studies, Wilson STEM Academy
Registration Details & Deadlines http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eg022yqc7659b20c&llr=uznkfneab
Cost $0.00
Who is Invited General Public
Parking Details

Charlotte Teachers Institute invites the community to examine how American values are shaped, shared and challenged at Exploring American Sacred Values on Thursday, Feb. 21, at the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts+Culture. The program features presentations and discussions with local educators who studied the topic together in a 2018 CTI seminar, including Johnson C. Smith University Religion Scholar Kendall Mobley and 10 Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools teachers.

The event begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m. showcasing new teaching ideas that educators developed during their CTI seminar led by Mobley. The main program begins at 6:30 p.m., featuring mini-presentations by Mobley and four teachers on a range of topics, followed by a panel discussion moderated by Angie Chandler, senior manager of programs + educational initiatives at the Gantt Center.

Mobley will discuss American civil religion as “religion repurposed to infuse the present political order and with sacred significance and authority” and how it shapes current national traditions, symbols and beliefs. The four teacher mini-presentations will examine: CMS values related to America’s founding fathers, pay-for-play in college sports, forced conformity in early Native American schools, and media influence on social values and the American dream.

During the reception other seminar teachers will share poster presentations on American values topics they targeted to address with their students: how social organizations such as Charlotte’s Excelsior Club nurtured community; segregation, civil rights and legislation; voting as a civic duty; oppression of women; acculturation of English language learners; and what it means to be an American.

Reception guests can also view the Gantt Center’s What We Ask Is Simple exhibition about 20th Century protest and Welcome to Brookhill exhibition about economic equity and affordable housing during the reception.

This event is part of CTI’s Teachers As Scholars educational series for the public that highlights collaborative work by professors and teachers in CTI seminars. This Feb. 21 event is supported by a grant from UNC Charlotte’s Chancellor’s Diversity Challenge Fund.

About Charlotte Teachers Institute
CTI is an educational partnership among Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Johnson C. Smith University that works to improve teaching in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. CTI cultivates content-knowledge, creativity, leadership skills and collaboration within and among Charlotte’s public school teachers. Applications are now open to all CMS classroom teachers for the upcoming 2019 seminars. Apply online at charlotteteachers.org by March 10, 2019.

CTI is made possible by a joint commitment of resources from all three Institute partners and through the generosity of funders such as Wells Fargo and the North Carolina Humanities Council. The Institute is housed at UNC Charlotte within the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

About the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts+Culture
The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture is a multi-disciplinary arts institution located in the heart of Charlotte, North Carolina. Founded in 1974, the Gantt Center’s mission is to present, preserve and celebrate excellence in the art, history and culture of African-Americans and those of African descent through visual and literary arts, dance, music, film, educational programs, theatre productions and community outreach. The Gantt Center features fine art and history exhibitions from around the world and is home to the nationally celebrated John and Vivian Hewitt Collection of African-American Art, which was generously donated by Bank of America, and is accessible online.

Named for Charlotte civic leader and former mayor Harvey Bernard Gantt, the Gantt Center is housed in an inspired and distinguished award-winning structure designed by architect Philip Freelon, co-designer of the new Smithsonian National Museum for African American History and Culture. For more information, visit ganttcenter.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Exploring American Sacred Values - Kendall Mobley, Assistant Professor of Religion, Johnson C. Smith University
Intersection of African-Americans, Civil Religion and Media Influence - Franchone Bey, Teacher of Creative Writing, Speech & Debate, Film as Literature, Journalism; West Charlotte High School
Harmony at the Key: Conversations on the Court - Deborah Brown, Teacher of English Language and Composition, Zebulon Vance High School
At What Cost? Native American Children and Boarding Schools of the 19th and 20th Centuries - Tracy Kennedy, Teacher of Elementary Language Arts and Social Studies, E. E. Waddell Language Academy
Recognizing the Wilson Way Values in the American Revolution - Pia Townes, Teacher of 8th Grade Social Studies, Wilson STEM Academy

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